THE TAIPEI RICCI INSTITUTE

THE TAIPEI RICCI INSTITUTE

Named after the great Italian sinologist, Matteo Ricci, the Ricci Institute was founded in 1966 by FFr Yves Raguin (1912-1998), Jean Lefeuvre and other Jesuits as a work of the Chinese Province of the Society of Jesus. The purpose of the Institute was originally to continue the Jesuit lexicographic endeavor while developing research in comparative spiritualities and Chinese religions. The TRI is the co-author of the Grand Ricci. Since the beginning of the 90s. the Institute has refocused its work on (a) Taiwanese studies, especially aboriginal languages and religious/ cultural transformations; (b) dialogue with Chinese intellectuals on cultural diversity, sustainable development and spiritual empowerment; (c) and, presently, coordination of various research programs on Pacific and Austronesian studies.

 

The Institute has developed a rich library now being transfered to Taiwan Central Library. 

In January 2004, the Institute founded “Renlai Monthly”, in order to foster debate in the Chinese world on issues linked to cultural diversity, sustainable development and spiritual empowerment. The companion “eRenlai.com” website also contributes to nurture communication among social agents, intellectuals and grassroots communities.

 

Read more on the history of the Institute.

 

erenlai.com

 

台北利氏學社

台北利氏學社於 1966年由甘易逢(Yves Raguin, 1912-1998)、雷煥章等耶穌會士所創立。其名「利氏」乃為紀念四百多年前赴中國傳教的開拓者利瑪竇(Matteo Ricci, 1552-1610)。在初期,學社致力於探索中國文化、宗教與社會,在國際漢學領域占有一席之地,並從中發展出辭典編纂的使命。歷經五十餘年的努力,利 氏學社出版了全世界規模最大的《利氏漢法辭典》(Le Grand Ricci)及其他多種雙語及專門辭典。

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Named after the great Italian sinologist, Matteo Ricci, the Ricci Institute was founded in 1966 by Fr Yves Raguin (1912-1998), Jean Lefeuvre and other Jesuits as a work of the Chinese Province of the Society of Jesus. The purpose of the Institute was originally to continue the Jesuit lexicographic endeavor while developing research in comparative spiritualities and Chinese religions. The TRI is the co-author of the Grand Ricci. Since the beginning of the 90s. the Institute has refocused its work on (a) Taiwanese studies, especially aboriginal languages and religious/ cultural transformations; (b) dialogue with Chinese intellectuals on cultural diversity, sustainable development and spiritual empowerment; (c) and, presently, coordination of various research programs on Pacific and Austronesian studies.

Read More...